Home > Stuttering.Microblog > Self-disclosure of stuttering at the beginning of interactions may improve listeners’ perceptions of people who stutter

Self-disclosure of stuttering at the beginning of interactions may improve listeners’ perceptions of people who stutter

Self-disclosure of stuttering at the beginning of interactions may (?) improve listeners’ perceptions of people who stutter. A simple lit review will reveal that this kind of study has been done before.  Numerous times.  And they all say the same thing.  Disclosing stuttering (which is a self-disclosing pathology anyway) improves society’s perception of the stutterer.  And I’m going out on a limb here… not “may” improve, but “will” improve (for the vast majority of the time).  Again, stuttering is a self-revealing asset; so how do we benefit from trying to pretend that it doesn’t exist?

So to my stuttering peeps out there… the data is clear.  And while it may initially feel antithetical to purpsefully disclose stuttering to listeners, it certainly seems to be in our best interest.

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  1. Greg @ Stuttering.me
    April 18th, 2009 at 09:51 | #1

    Great to see that the post is the source of some great discussion!

    http://www.stutteringforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=3372

    [Reply]

    Bethany Laranjo Reply:

    I don’t really tell anyone, I wish I did in my english class or just by e-mail, I think that’s where I am right now, I could never just go up tp someone, anyway, We all had to present a psa that we got through the internet. He said it’s fine if everybody doesn’t go you just won’t get credit and It was the beginning of the semester, so I thought I want to get credit I will go up, (usually sonething in high school I would pass on). so I did. I had a paper with all of the questions that hw gave us, but I didnt use it, no one else did, but I couldn’t really get any words out, and then after the class was over he said I did a good job, and he was glad that I went up, so I thought ok he knows I stutter. But when I was going over a paper w/ him that everybody had to do. meet with him. He said that in class you seem nervous, are you nervous?, I said no, then he said ok, I really regret that now. (anyway), Know I am wondering if I should do my memoir on stuttering experiences IDK. just rambling.

    [Reply]

  2. Greg @ Stuttering.me
    April 18th, 2009 at 21:25 | #2

    I would most definitely keep a stuttering memoir. Looking back, I wish I did. And here’s why–Once a stutterer, always a stutterer…but sometimes I can ‘forget’ how I felt. How it was for me. I don’t ‘forget’, I just don’t remember as quickly as I ought. And when this happens, I find that I’m not appreciating the experiences of others as I should.

    It’s almost like when people legitimately question my peace with self or stuttering, etc. They see me now and can’t believe I got where I am. But the reality is that they never saw me then, and struggle through things the way I did.

    So yes, I do wish I had the opportunity to crawl up in my head from 10 or 15 years ago. I honestly wonder if it would make me a better professional and (stuttering) person.

    Secondly–There is no shame in shame. We *all* go through this kind of thing. 20/20 hindsight, should’ve/would’ve/could’ve. No sense looking back; instead, get excited about the future (and how you can change it with your new perspective).

    Thanks for reading, and for your great comment! See you online 🙂

    [Reply]

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