Is traditional stuttering therapy really *that* important?

I ran across an interesting post from the Thinking Cities blog, and it’s always interesting to read how others arrived at their (life) conclusions.  As a researcher, I’m not 100% buying into this view of the stuttering phenomenon, but I think the poster most certainly has the essence.  And as such, I’m confident that our perspectives (along with many of Stutteirng.Me’s readers) are in alignment.  Truth has a tendency of revealing itself that way…

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Pagoclone experiences continue to trickle on to the web…

Ran across a post by the Helm’s Family Blog regarding someone that is in the Phase IIb Pagoclone trial.  The poster recognizes that it’s a double-blind study, and cites that his severity is mild enough such that an effect may or may not reveal itself.  (Which is exactly what we want–we want all parties to be skeptical of the treatment effect, so that if/when it happens, it’s real and not a placebo; this is a massive problem in pretty much all stuttering treatment.)  I hope he posts updates w/ future experiences…

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ReTweet: Bullying (and Stuttering)

Pam has a terrific post on Bullying, where she links to some other great articles and resources.  Little to add that she has not already said better than I could have.

To be honest, I’ve not spent a lot of time thinking about the subject.  My gut suggests that what makes bullying so hard to live under is that the bullied is under the perception that they are powerless and have no other choice but to live under it and endure it.  (Looking back at my own life, there were times that school teachers would say and do wholly inappropriate things that I tolerated, because I felt like I deserved it.  Perhaps a variant on bullying?)

And to the next point; what bothers me is how society looks down upon physical self-defense.  I’ve got no problem if the victim of repeated psychological abuse takes matters into their own hands.  Clearly nothing like a Columbine, where life (especially innocent life) is taken; nothing to “get back” at the bullies.  But at times it feels like very few people really understand how to deal with bullies.  *Stand*Up*To*Them* and stop the bullying before (or during) the event.

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The relationship between stuttering, isolation, forgiveness & community

I read a great post at Pam’s site entitled “Social Acceptance and Stuttering.”  And it led me to think a little bit–regardless of how you cut it, stuttering can result in some fashion of personal isolation.  If we chase the fluency god in hopes of gaining better acceptance into fluent society, we’ll fail on both accounts and subsequently feel isolated.  (And largely, I maintain, because of a hope/myth that if stuttering stopped–all of life’s problems will dissipate.)  So if we cease to chase the fluency gods, we can certainly improve our quality of life.  But–will this change societal acceptance?  No–it doesn’t.  Even in the groups (such as family) that often seem to matter the most.  Subsequently, we can feel isolated.  Either way, isolation may be a part of living with stuttering.

So how to deal with this sense of isolation?  I’d like to hear some thoughts!  With me, it has been through forgiveness (of self and others) and prioritizing personal relationships (such as a greater emphasis within the stuttering self-help community).

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The Peer Attitudes Toward Children Who Stutter Scale

New reseach reveals that (fluent) kids have negative attitudes towards stuttering kids.  And now, thanks to science, we have a survey that can reliabily document this discovery with validity.

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The monster study gets a little attention

Here’s a quick blog post about the monster study; it seems pretty accurate, although I’ve never read credible support stating that kids were truly turned into “stutterers”, but rather that these kids gained a nice healthy fear of repeated unjust social punishment.  (Unfortunately, Johnson wasn’t a real scientist, and likely saw what he wanted to see.)  My other comment is to really question if Johnson *did* indeed help his stuttering people.  His “seminal” work took us on a really bad detour for decades, and his flawed perspective continues to haunt the entire field of SLP even today.

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The empowerment of young online stutterers

I’m continually amazed when I read online entries (written by stuttering kids and teens).  It’s so great to see how far the self-help movement has come over the past 30 years.  Thanks John...

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The Case of the Stuttering Lecturer

Stumbled across a great post by Grant Meredith regarding living with stuttering as (what I assume to be) a professor.  My experiences seem to mirror Grant‘s quite well.  Yet more evidence that stuttering and effective communication are not on the same spectrum.

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More on Darren Sproles, (stuttering) rock star

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Ravings of a lunatic: Tactile speech feedback reduces stuttered speaking behaviors

One of my personal qualities, for better or worse, is an ability to see reality from a unique perspective.  (Or–a disability to see reality from the commonly accepted perspective.)  For about 10 years, I’ve known that feeling my thyroid cartilage vibrate while speaking helped reduce moments of overt stuttered speaking behaviors.  (In other words, feel your throat vibrate with your fingers while speaking…)  Some of my profs in school thought it was a dumb idea, but I knew it worked for me.  So when I consulted in our clinic, I would toss it out to some clients and see if it helped them.  It would.  So I did a small study on it, and found that it reduces stuttered speaking behaviors by about 72%.  Kind of a neat party-trick, but it can come in handy when reading credit card numbers or a name/address while on the telephone…

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